Author: Whole Health Web Admin

Vitamin D and Asthma

A study that was published in Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research (2013 Sept; 5(5): 283-8) looked at the relationship between vitamin D levels and asthma severity. Researchers analyzed 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in serum collected from 121 asthmatic adults from Costa Rica to investigate the association between vitamin D levels and the severity of their disease. Vitamin D levels below 30 ng/mL, we defined as insufficient. Asthma severity was determined by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC). When the population was stratified by vitamin D status, 91% of asthmatic patients with vitamin D levels...

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Folic Acid and Cholesterol Levels

Folic acid is not usually the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of high cholesterol, but a small study published in Medical Science Monitor (2013 Sept 4; 19: 733-9), looked at low-dose folic acid supplementation and cholesterol in 124 subjects. The subjects were Caucasian, between the ages of 19 and 39 years of age, with risk factors for atherosclerosis (either a family history of stroke, high cholesterol, sedentary lifestyle, obesity (or overweight), or smoking). The subjects were given a low dose of folic acid daily (400 mcg/day) for a period of 12 weeks. Supplementation with the folic acid was found to be associated with a significant reduction in mean concentration of total cholesterol in females (203.4 vs. 193.1 mg/dL) and in males (209.5 vs. 201.9), and decreases in LDL cholesterol as well (107.4 vs 99.99 mg/dL in females and 121.5 vs 115.1 mg/dL in...

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Can the Fat in Your Diet Put You in a Better Mood?

Whether or not you are depressed may have to do with the type of fat in your diet. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition (November 1, 2013 vol. 143 no. 11 1743-1752) looked at 1,746 adults between the ages of 30 and 65 years. Increased symptoms of depression were noted in just over 25% of the women and around 18% of the men who took part in the study. The researchers found a relationship between the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet (omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish oil). Specifically, in women, the highest tertile of omega-3 fatty acids intake was associated with a reduced odds of EDS by 49%, as compared to the lowest tertile. Specifically, in women, the highest tertile of omega-3 fatty acids intake was associated with a reduced odds of EDS by 49%, as compared to the lowest tertile. Furthermore, the omega-3 PUFA to omega-6 PUFA ratio was inversely associated to EDS in women, and a similar pattern was found for omega-3 HUFA vs omega-6 HUFAs. The authors conclude, “…among United States women, higher intakes of n-3 fatty acids [absolute (n-3) and relative to n-6 fatty acids (n-3:n-6)] were associated with lower risk of elevated depressive symptoms, specifically in domains of somatic complaints (mainly n-3 PUFAs) and positive affect (mainly n-3...

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